SC12 Home > SC12 Schedule > SC12 Presentation - Effect of Installation Geometry on Turbulent Mixing Noise from Jet Engine Exhaust

SCHEDULE: NOV 10-16, 2012

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Effect of Installation Geometry on Turbulent Mixing Noise from Jet Engine Exhaust

SESSION: Scientific Visualization Showcase Reception

EVENT TYPE: Scientific Visualization Showcases

TIME: 5:15PM - 7:00PM

AUTHOR(S):Joseph A. Insley, Umesh Paliath, Sachin Premasuthan

ROOM:North Foyer

ABSTRACT:
Jet noise is one of the most dominant noise components from an aircraft engine that radiates over a wide frequency range. Empirical and semi-empirical models that rely on scaling laws and calibrations of constants based on the far field acoustic measurements are limited in their range of applicability, as universal calibration over variations in operating conditions and nozzle geometries is impossible. In recent years direct jet noise prediction using large eddy simulation (LES) and computational aero-acoustics methodology has attracted increasing attention in the jet noise community. Over the past decades jet noise reduction has been achieved mainly through increase of engine bypass ratio, which lowers jet speed for a given thrust. As under-wing-mounted engine diameters increase, jet axes must move closer to the airframe, to maintain the same ground clearance. This close-coupling now means that installation noise plays a major part in community noise reduction matrix. It is essential to be able to predict and understand the altering of the noise source generation and propagation mechanisms in the presence of forward flight and installation geometries like pylon, wing and flap. Very few studies have been conducted to assess this aspect of nozzle design. Such knowledge is vital to engine and airframe integration. General Electric builds on previous work to extend the applicability of the LES based approach to predict jet flap interaction (JFI) effects from more realistic wing/flap configurations. This visualization compares the results of applying this approach to various jet nozzle configurations, both with and without installation geometries.

Chair/Author Details:

Joseph A. Insley - Argonne National Laboratory

Umesh Paliath - GE Global Research

Sachin Premasuthan - GE Global Research

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Effect of Installation Geometry on Turbulent Mixing Noise from Jet Engine Exhaust

SESSION: Scientific Visualization Showcase Reception

EVENT TYPE:

TIME: 5:15PM - 7:00PM

AUTHOR(S):Joseph A. Insley, Umesh Paliath, Sachin Premasuthan

ROOM:North Foyer

ABSTRACT:
Jet noise is one of the most dominant noise components from an aircraft engine that radiates over a wide frequency range. Empirical and semi-empirical models that rely on scaling laws and calibrations of constants based on the far field acoustic measurements are limited in their range of applicability, as universal calibration over variations in operating conditions and nozzle geometries is impossible. In recent years direct jet noise prediction using large eddy simulation (LES) and computational aero-acoustics methodology has attracted increasing attention in the jet noise community. Over the past decades jet noise reduction has been achieved mainly through increase of engine bypass ratio, which lowers jet speed for a given thrust. As under-wing-mounted engine diameters increase, jet axes must move closer to the airframe, to maintain the same ground clearance. This close-coupling now means that installation noise plays a major part in community noise reduction matrix. It is essential to be able to predict and understand the altering of the noise source generation and propagation mechanisms in the presence of forward flight and installation geometries like pylon, wing and flap. Very few studies have been conducted to assess this aspect of nozzle design. Such knowledge is vital to engine and airframe integration. General Electric builds on previous work to extend the applicability of the LES based approach to predict jet flap interaction (JFI) effects from more realistic wing/flap configurations. This visualization compares the results of applying this approach to various jet nozzle configurations, both with and without installation geometries.

Chair/Author Details:

Joseph A. Insley - Argonne National Laboratory

Umesh Paliath - GE Global Research

Sachin Premasuthan - GE Global Research

Add to iCal  Click here to download .ics calendar file

Add to Outlook  Click here to download .vcs calendar file

Add to Google Calendarss  Click here to add event to your Google Calendar