SC12 Home > SC12 Schedule > SC12 Presentation - A Dynamic Portrait of Global Aerosols

SCHEDULE: NOV 10-16, 2012

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A Dynamic Portrait of Global Aerosols

SESSION: Scientific Visualization Showcase Reception

EVENT TYPE: Scientific Visualization Showcases

TIME: 5:15PM - 7:00PM

AUTHOR(S):William Putman

ROOM:North Foyer

ABSTRACT:
Through numerical experiments that simulate our current knowledge of the dynamical and physical processes that govern weather and climate variability of Earth's atmosphere, models create a dynamic portrait of our planet. The simulation visualized here captures how winds lift up aerosols from the Earths surface and transport them around the globe. Such simulations allow scientists to identify the source and pathway of these tiny particulates that influence weather and climate. Each frame covers a 30-minute interval, from September 1, 2006 to January 31, 2007. With a resolution of 10 kilometers per grid cell, among the highest resolutions for any global atmospheric model, the simulation represents a variety of features worldwide. Winds near the surface and aloft (white) lift up sea-salt (blue) from the oceans, dust (red) from the earths surface, disperse plumes of sulphates (ash brown) from volcanic eruptions and fossil fuel emissions, and carry organic and black carbon (green) within smoke from wildfires and human-initiated burning (red-yellow dots) as detected by NASAs MODIS satellite. These tiny particles can be transported large distances from their sources within the strong winds of the atmospheric circulation and have a significant impact on air quality, visibility and human health. The full simulation covers 2-years from May-2005 to May-2007, using the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) and Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model run on 3750 processors of the Discover supercomputer at the NASA Center for Climate Simulation, consuming 3-million processor hours and producing over 400 TB of data.

Chair/Author Details:

William Putman - NASA

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A Dynamic Portrait of Global Aerosols

SESSION: Scientific Visualization Showcase Reception

EVENT TYPE:

TIME: 5:15PM - 7:00PM

AUTHOR(S):William Putman

ROOM:North Foyer

ABSTRACT:
Through numerical experiments that simulate our current knowledge of the dynamical and physical processes that govern weather and climate variability of Earth's atmosphere, models create a dynamic portrait of our planet. The simulation visualized here captures how winds lift up aerosols from the Earths surface and transport them around the globe. Such simulations allow scientists to identify the source and pathway of these tiny particulates that influence weather and climate. Each frame covers a 30-minute interval, from September 1, 2006 to January 31, 2007. With a resolution of 10 kilometers per grid cell, among the highest resolutions for any global atmospheric model, the simulation represents a variety of features worldwide. Winds near the surface and aloft (white) lift up sea-salt (blue) from the oceans, dust (red) from the earths surface, disperse plumes of sulphates (ash brown) from volcanic eruptions and fossil fuel emissions, and carry organic and black carbon (green) within smoke from wildfires and human-initiated burning (red-yellow dots) as detected by NASAs MODIS satellite. These tiny particles can be transported large distances from their sources within the strong winds of the atmospheric circulation and have a significant impact on air quality, visibility and human health. The full simulation covers 2-years from May-2005 to May-2007, using the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) and Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model run on 3750 processors of the Discover supercomputer at the NASA Center for Climate Simulation, consuming 3-million processor hours and producing over 400 TB of data.

Chair/Author Details:

William Putman - NASA

Add to iCal  Click here to download .ics calendar file

Add to Outlook  Click here to download .vcs calendar file

Add to Google Calendarss  Click here to add event to your Google Calendar